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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
as they reelected angela merkel as the party leader. she will now stand in national elections at the end of next year. after being renamed cdu chairwoman, delegates stood and applauded for nearly eight minutes. >> 903 votes -- that is 97.94%. >> a landslide victory for angela merkel. the record results left the unusually unflappable leader of germany's conservatives struggling to find words. >> those who know me know that i am really overwhelmed and moved, and i would like to express my sincere thanks. >> merkel has been at the helm of the cd you since 2000, but her leadership has never received such a resounding endorsement. her popularity is at an all-time high, and her speech ahead of the vote struck a triumphant note. >> this coalition is the most successful government since germany's reunification. unemployment is at its lowest level since 1990, and employment levels are the highest they have ever been, creating work and security for millions of people and families. >> on the eurozone debt crisis, merkel called once again on brussels to impose strict budgetary discipline on eu member states
in washington, d.c. i bet you if you could hold another election in january if they allow that to happen, republicans would lose control of the house. i think this is going to be their downfall and i believe more and more republicans privately understand that. and they're worried. they're worried. i don't think politically they can afford to stick to their guns and if they do, you know, they're going to pay the price. victoria is in warwick rhode island. good morning. >> caller: hi, how are you? >> bill: i'm good. what's your point this morning? >> caller: my point is i'm sick and tired of their domination. you know? >> bill: yeah. and they lost the election, right, victoria? >> caller: i know. but they still -- this is all about domination. they want to call the shots. and it's time for them to get kicked to the curb! if not into the middle of the street! [ laughter ] you know? this baloney. they have been so destructive for the last four years. not only that, so insulting to our own president. we've never b
reason why we are seeing confidence fall. alisyn: do you think the days after a presidential election are normally filled with promise, the promise of better days ahead. there is a high from election? but this with the consumer confidence plunging how do you make sense of it so soon after the elections? >> it was a miserable election. wasn't it. the whole time we had a small conversation. the president ran a pretty negative campaign and didn't win a mandate on big stuff. he did talk about his desire to increase taxes which may go to melissa's point. but after an elect like this. there isn't that goodwill. there isn't that kind of national coming together that you might have seen for, say, bill clinton or ronald reagan and their reelection. people are pretty bummed out. alisyn: tell us what the larger issue is. does this mean people won't be spending as much on christmas gifts in how do it translate to what it means to the economy? >> it's always hard to reconcile how people feel and how they act. we know you may feel like you shouldn't spend a lot of money but when push comes to showf
and majoritarianism. winning elections is the easy part. the question is whether they can govern, whether there's any tolerance for minorities, for multiple points of view. he did a power grab. there's now pushback. i think it's wrong to assume, though, that all the people pushing back are necessarily democrats. >> no. >> a lot of people are just going to try to take advantage. >> but everybody's pushing back, and certainly elements of mubarak's regime are looking for an opportunity to regain some power. but you also have coptic christian pushing back, other islamists pushing back, some even more extreme. >> exactly. >> you have all elements pushing back here. i'm absolutely bewildered as to why morsi thought he could get away with this. >> these are guys, morsi, who are either in jail or in the streets in opposition for their entire careers. they come into office. why would we think that they spent all their time out of office reading the federalists papers in arabic translations? they didn't. the only political game they know how to play is the old play. >> get power. >> seize it. in this case, the
's suggestion that these are really big issues and very big decisions that should be made by our elected representatives in the senate and in the house. i'm not sure i like this idea that the president and the house majority leader, a republican, get to meet behind closed doors and get to make enormous fiscal decisions just between the two of them. >> do you think more would get done if they did this in front of the cameras? >> i actually think it should be one extreme or the other. they should either lock them behind closed doors until they get something done, let them hash it out, and then come out and announce the deal that we're not going to go over the fiscal cliff, or put everything on television. because i don't think i thought i would ever say this, but i do agree with grover nordqvist that this could give a hint about what each party is doing and who they are protecting. i think the democrats and the president would come out looking good on this, because from the very beginning they have said that they want to protect the middle class, extending middle class tax cuts. frankly, t
these negotiations. if he really was going to have an about face after the election and really concerned about the legacy, i actually disagree to a certain extent because i think that he thinks the first four years was his legacy. >> yeah. i think you're right to some extent. this is obviously we're speculating here. the president could, this might happen, might be a last minute razzle dazzle here, where he rushes in and they've already kind of agreed to a deal and he didn't get everything he wants, but he gets most of what he wants. he might envision something like that. i'm telling you, when i heard folks like lindsey graham over the weekend say, i don't think there is going to be a deal, that kind of stuck with me and maybe there won't be a deal. i'm not sure that's such a bad thing given what the alternatives are. >> steve: i'm sure you've heard or seen that apparently the republicans doomsday plan, if the talks collapse, allowed the vote on extending the middle tax class tax cuts, the senate passed that back in august, and the republicans would all vote present, then allow the democrats t
and france elected to retake the canal by force of arms and enlisted israel's help in that effort. israel sought an alliance of convenience between britain and france and herself and launched this war. >> i want to show on this map here where the lines -- the diagonal lines, one at the bottom is sinai. over here is the gulf of suez. for the audience to look around and see where jordan is located. jordan used to control that area in the middle of israel which is the west bank. then you have syria at the top and lebanon. 1956 war lasted how long? >> well, for the british and french, it lasted about three days. the israelis it continued a little bit longer, about three, four days because israel started it. the invasion of the suez canal occurred on november 3 or 4 and israel launched their attack on the 29th of october. >> who led the country then? >> david was the prime minister. >> where were people like ariel sharon? were they involved? >> ariel sharon was involved in a very controversial action. this gets complicated, right. as part of the deal with britain and france and israel, israel
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)